A Year And A Day

by Edwidge Danticat January 17, 2011

In the Haitian vodou tradition, it is believed by some that the souls of the newly dead slip into rivers and streams and remain there, under the water, for a year and a day. Then, lured by ritual prayer and song, the souls emerge from the water and the spirits are reborn. These reincarnated spirits go on to occupy trees, and, if you listen closely, you may hear their hushed whispers in the wind. The spirits can also hover over mountain ranges, or in grottoes, or caves, where familiar voices echo our own when we call out their names. The year-and-a-day commemoration is seen, in families that believe in it and practice it, as a tremendous obligation, an honorable duty, in part because it assures a transcendental continuity of the kind that has kept us Haitians, no matter where we live, linked to our ancestors for generations.

Read more:
http://www.newyorker.com/talk/comment/2011/01/17/110117taco_talk_danticat

Read about the author here:
http://aalbc.com/authors/edwidge.htm

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About fromourisland

Gardener, knitter, wife, mother of 2, grandmother, and lots more.
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